Friday, August 9, 2013

Tartine's Country Bread and a Couple of Links

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I've been baking bread. A lot of it and it's because I finally opened the Tartine Bread book I got last Christmas and I am now totally obsessed with it's country loaf. I bake about two loaves a week (save for those crazy weeks of nearly 100ยบ temps) and in order not to actually turn part bread, I always try to give one away to my neighbor. I take a quick photo of most loaves I make, noting differences based on time the dough spends resting, baking time and temperature. It has all been really fun and educational, I highly recommend it.

Chad Robertson's instructions are lengthy and specific so for that reason I am not printing the recipe here, and if you love to bake bread or if you would like to try it you should really spend some time with this book and the author's words, all eleven pages of them.

And a few things

I started writing a weekend baking column for Food52 and the first one is up now. I made a pie, shocking, I know.

Earlier this week I was a guest on Heritage Radio Network's The Food Seen with Michael Harlan Turkell. We chatted about food, photography, and the WWF. Yep, the World Wrestling Federation somehow made it into the conversation. You can listen to the episode HERE.

Last weekend I helped my pal Vanessa with a fun photo shoot.

Have a great weekend!

tartine's country loaf
tartine's country loaf tartine's country loaf

21 comments:

  1. Beautiful and bravo, Yossy! That crumb looks ace.

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  2. This is so gorgeous! LOVE that you're baking your own bread now. I seriously need to do it more.

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  3. Such beautiful bread! And look at those gorgeous air pockets. It's all about the air pockets right? Congrats on the Food52 column, hopping over to check it out.

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  4. This bread looks delicious! I have only baked bread once, it makes me nervous!

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  5. I just tried a mix of the pie you posted on Food52 and the berry apricot galettes you made a few posts ago. It was delicious! I'm glad I finally tried this other pie dough... you had sold the 'I made that!' pie dough so well that I refused to switch for a while! I thought the rye dough had more flavor, but texture wise, I think I prefer the effect that the smearing technique creates. However, I'm also thinking I might simply not have used the correct rye flour. I'm fortunate enough to live right by a flour shop, and they sell six different types of rye flour: 815, 997, 1150 1370, whole, and groats, each with the additional choice of bio or not. I really wasn't too sure which type to buy for this dough. What would you recommend?

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    1. Wow! You are lucky to live by a flour shop. I'm sorry to say that am not familiar with all of the flours you have mentioned here, but I have used both finely ground light and dark rye flours with this recipe both with great success. I slighly prefer the dark rye because I find it to be more flavorful. I hope that helps!

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    2. I tried it a second time with a darker rye, and I found it indeed to be more flavorful :) Thanks for the tip!

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  6. Love this bread. I make it one, maybe two time a week. Just saw your food52 column, looks fantastic. I've made a rye crust before and it's fantastic! Thanks for the reminder!

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  7. Beautiful loaves! I have the Tartine Bread book but am too intimidated to try it out. Both times I attempted making sourdough starter, they went moldy! But now that the weather's been mild I suppose I can try again.

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  8. Daaaang, look at the cross-section on that crumb! Nothing more satisfying than baking a killer loaf of bread to be proud of (and eat, of course!).

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  9. I just listened to your radio program and I haven't realized you shoot with film. I love your photographs and now I know why. I also haven't realized you are Iranian. Iranian cuisine is so interesting and flavorful, reminds me a little of Greek (I'm from Greece). I hope you share some Iranian recipes at some point.

    Your bread looks amazing. I have to get that book!

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    1. Hi Magda, thanks so much for listening to the show and I am a huge fan of Greek food!

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  10. Homemade bread is such a tough one for me. I've only ever achieved a nearly-edible loaf. I've loved seeing your gorgeous breads on my Instagram feed and am inspired to try again. Learning to bake bread seems like a wonderful way to spend the winter. I'll pick up the Tartine book, and hope for the best. And a huge congrats on your Food52 column; I'm really looking forward to seeing what you create over there!

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    1. With all of your cooking and baking knowledge, you will master bread in no time. I have faith in you, Elizabeth!

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  11. .. a little bit burned, isn't it...

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  12. Stunning crumb! I love baking breads too. Hope to catch up with this fantastic bread making book

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  13. Beautiful bread! One question about the recipe: during bulk fermentation it says to turn every 30 minutes for the first 2 hours but doesn't specify how many turns the next 1-2 hrs. What do you do?

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  14. Beautiful bread! One question about the recipe: during bulk fermentation it says to turn every 30 minutes for the first 2 hours but doesn't specify how many turns the next 1-2 hrs. What do you do?

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    1. Hi Abby! I keep turning it every half hour (or so).

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