1 Apt. 2B Baking Co.: Mixed Citrus Marmalade

Friday, January 6, 2012

Mixed Citrus Marmalade



Last year I added some booze to my marmalade which was a fun, easy way to step up a classic preserve, but in the process of consuming those jars I learned something important about myself. I am a bit of a marmalade wimp. I can't handle the thick cut rind found in most marmalade and I found myself picking around it. This year I played it safe, turning back to my favorite (and first) marmalade recipe from Marisa at Food in Jars. This style of marmalade only uses the zest of the fruit sliced in very thin strips which give the marmalade great texture and cuts back on some of the bitterness of the thick cut varieties. It takes a bit of time to prepare the fruit, but I can't think of a nicer way to spend a dark winter afternoon than to dive into a big pile of sunny citrus.

Mixed Citrus Marmalade
adapted from Food in Jars
yield about 24oz of finished marmalade

40oz (2.5lbs) mixed citrus fruit, I used 1 grapefruit, 2 tangelos, 1 tangerine and 2 meyer lemons (It was a real clean out the fruit bowl affair)
3c sugar
2c zest poaching liquid (you will make this in Step 1)
clean, sterilized canning jars and lids

1. Remove the peels from your citrus using a vegetable peeler, careful not to get any of the white pith. Cut the peels into thin strips with a sharp knife. The peels wil not reduce in size after you cook them so make sure to cut them very fine, 1/8''-1/4'' depending on your preference. I like to cut them as fine as possible. Combine your zest strips with about 4 cups of cold water in a medium sized saucepan and bring the mixture to a boil. Cook the zest strips until they are very soft, about 30min.
2. While the zest is boiling away, get to supreming. Cut away the tops and bottoms of the fruit, then with a very sharp knife, cut the white pith away from the outside of the fruit and discard it. Over a bowl, carefully cut the wedges of fruit away from the membrane letting the fruit and juices fall into the bowl. Save the membrane and seeds and place them in a cheesecloth bundle. You will use this bundle to add some natural pectin while cooking the marmalade.
3. When the zest is finished, strain it over a large bowl, making sure to reserve 2c of the poaching liquid.
4. Grab your (non reactive) canning pot and dump in the fruit segments and juice, poached zest, poaching liquid, sugar, and the cheesecloth bag. Bring the mixture to a boil and cook the hell out of it until it reaches 220º and passes the wrinkle test. You may have to cook the jam for a few minutes after it reaches 220º, it all depends on the mixture of fruit you use. I ended up cooking my marmalade for about 50min, but I would start checking it for doneness at about 30min. When the marmalade is finished, give the cheesecloth bag a good squeeze and discard it.
5. Ladle into clean, sterilized jars and process in a boiling water bath for 5 minutes.

Notes:
- Some folks say that the wrinkle test is unreliable for marmalade, so if you are concerned I suggest you cook the mixture until it reaches 220º then ladle it into jars without testing.
- This recipe can easily be doubled
- If you'd like to add any flavorings to the marmalade, like some booze or vanilla, add it in the last five minutes of cooking.

17 comments:

  1. I love the idea of mixed citrus marmalade! I'm going shopping tomorrow to try this recipe this week. Thank you for sharing. :)

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  2. So pretty! Love the photos and can't wait to make my own marmalade. I'm with you on the texture, and think it's smart to take the time to cut the pieces smaller.

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  3. I love how this uses the whole fruit, even extracting pectin and extra flavor from the membranes before discarding them. I want to make this to chase the winter blues away!

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    1. Betsy, give it a go. The bright smell of citrus is sure to alleviate the blues, if only for an afternoon...

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  4. I LOVE your blog; just found it and it's amazing. I too live in NYC! So happy to have found this recipe and your blog.
    Thank you!

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    1. Thanks Amie! I'm not an expert, but I am trying to include more vegan/GF recipes over here and I am glad you stopped by.

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  5. Hi Yossy! I would love to make this beautiful marmalade! I have two questions for you.

    1. When you say 40 oz. citrus, does that mean with the peel on? Or 40 oz. peeled?

    2. Do you think I could use tangelos only for this recipe?

    Thank you so much! Love your blog :)

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    Replies
    1. Hi Andrea - Yes, you want 40oz of whole fruit, but if you are off by an ounce or two, don't worry about it. You could definitely use just tangelos for this recipe! Happy Jamming!

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    2. I made this this morning using tangelos, meyer lemons, and sunkist lemons. I cooked it for longer than suggested because it seemed kind of liquidy. When all was said and done I put it in the fridge and then left for work. I just got it out to try some on toast for a snack, and it is all solid! I don't know what I did wrong, but I have NO idea how I am going to get it out of the jars. It is completely stuck! Any ideas on what could have gone wrong?!

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    3. Hey Andrea - I'm sorry to say but it sounds like you may have over cooked your marmalade. When the sugar gets too hot it caramelizes and becomes hard at room temp. You can try to get it out of the jars by taking the lids off and warming them in the microwave or running them under hot water.

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  6. That's what I thought happened :( I guess now I know! Thanks!

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  7. I've been making marmalade for years and your recipe works very well. Many combinations of citrus are possible and very good. It took me a long while to figure out the very best way to test for the right finished consistancy and my best recommendation is use a candy thermometer. It's essential for good spreadable results. Remember that different fruit combinations require more or less cooking time, BUT never stop cooking before you reach 218 degrees and never exceed 220 degrees. Sometimes it takes longer to get to that temp. but be patient. Those are the magic numbers for success. Using that temp rule I can make larger batches all at once. The temperature is key not necessarly the quantiy of each ingredient. Make beautiful lables and give away as gifts. Friends and family will love it.

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  8. Your recipe really inspired me! Thanks so much for posting it and the beautiful pictures!

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  9. What is the "wrinkle test"? Your mom suggested your recipe but I'm such a novice that I have no idea what that means. Thanks.

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    Replies
    1. Hi Shannon, this link is a great resource for figuring out when your jam is done: http://foodinjars.com/2010/07/canning-101-how-to-ensure-that-your-jam-sets/

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